One Month Review (32)

It’s already been a month since we started this trip; I can’t believe how time has flown.  So far, we’ve ridden 1,800 miles through 8 states, and we are finally settled into a good daily routine.  We have worked hard on unusual tanlines, and have met lots of very kind people.  It is sad to think that the end of our trip is nearing, but there is still so much to be excited for between now and then.  Soon, we will trade mountains for plains, which will be an entirely new experience.  We hope that you have all enjoyed following along so far and will continue to do so!

This morning, we packed up camp for the second day in a row alongside Nick and Mike.



Both groups set off a little before eight and were excited for a day of smaller hills than yesterday.


The route took us through Daniel Boone National Forest, which provided some beautiful scenery as well as a little bit of history.


We also crossed paths with another touring cyclist named Matt, who started biking in Washington in early April.  We chatted with him on the side of the road for almost an hour.  It’s always interesting to hear about how some else’s trip compares to your own.  Matt has had an amazing journey so far (link to his blog), and I’m sure it will continue to be just as exciting for the remainder, until he reaches the Atlantic at Virginia Beach (or maybe NYC?).  One of the topics we discussed was food, and Matt has long since sent his cooking gear home.  I’m tempted now to save a few pounds by getting rid of ours and eating cold food for the rest of the trip!


Rachel continues to struggle with dogs, and Kentucky has an excess of them which are hungry for cyclists.  She had an incident with a dog a few years back while jogging in Bozeman, and the dogs seem to sense the lingering anxiety she is left with as a result.  Today, one dog grabbed onto a piece of clothing as she was trying to get away, and another jumped a fence to antagonize her!  The funny part about the dog that jumped the fence…. he was in the house behind a glass door when I rode by only 30 second earlier.  We are working on our strategy for dealing with them to lessen her anxiety, but there are a few which use the surprise factor to their advantage.  Since bear spray is most likely in our future regardless, we may get some early to give her peace of mind.

Our destination for the day was the city of Berea, KY, where there is a beautiful college campus and a very nice library.  We had lunch under a gazebo in a little park (the main course was peanut butter and apple wraps), and then moved into the library for the afternoon.


We stayed at Oh! Kentucky Campground and RV Park, where we made some penne pasta with broccoli and canned chicken for dinner before calling it a night.

Trip stats, to date (Day 32)

  • Booneville, KY to Berea, KY
  • Daily mileage: 49.4mi;  Trip total to date: 1,834.6mi
  • Daily riding time: 4hr 11min;  Trip total time: 164hr 29min
  • Daily ascent: 3,859ft;  Trip total ascent: 100,071ft
  • Flat tires: Rachel – 1; Chris – 0

10 thoughts on “One Month Review (32)”

    1. It’s funny you say that– when we go out to eat, we almost always get a salad, since they are so rare in camping meals!

  1. I feel your anxiety rach. I got bit by my parents dog an get angry when dog owners dont control there dogs. It hurts physically an mentally
    Hang tough an carry a big can of pepper spray. Love linda

    1. Thanks!! I guess at least it’s a good adrenaline boost if I’m feeling particularly lethargic 🙂

  2. I’ve have heard a squirt of water from the water bottle is quite the shock. If they get to close or the bear spray would be good as long as you are up wind.

  3. Get a squirt gun and fill it with ammonia. That is how I kept them at bay on the paper route and once they had been shot they would run at the sight of the squirt gun. Vinegar might work as well.

    The other option that works, but is contrary to what you are thinking, is get off the bike and pick up some rocks to throw. Every dog that I have ever encountered that is aggressive has had rocks thrown at them, so the minute they see you bending over to pick up rocks they high tail it out of there. It is very rare that you actually have to throw a rock.

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